memorial request for proposal for brian bill

Letters: Rallying support for Brian Bill monument

January 24, 2015

"Although no sculptured marble should rise to their memory, nor engraved stone bear record of their deeds, yet will their remembrance be as lasting as the land they honored." These words by Daniel Webster speak to the memory of our country's unsung heroes, the men and women who answer the call to serve our nation and defend our freedom.

memorial request for proposal for brian bill

BBMF Request Proposal for Brian Bill Memorial for Veteran's Park

January 5, 2015

Brian Bill Memorial Fund invites interested parties to submit a Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) proposal for a memorial monument to be erected in Downtown Stamford's Veteran's Park.

memorial for brian bill

Honoring U.S. Navy Seal Brian Bill: City road named after fallen hero

Christina Chiarelli, September 30, 2013

FFamily, friends, state and local officials and the community came together at Stamford's Government Center, to honor Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill. Bill was a U.S. Navy Seal from Stamford. He was killed in action in Afghanistan on August 6, 2011 when the helicopter he and 30 other SEALs were riding in was shot down by enemy fire. They had participated in a daring nighttime mission. Now a portion of Washington Blvd. is named after Bill, the Chief Special Warfare Operator. A committee has been created in his name and also honors all others who have fought in the latest U.S. war on Terror. The City is planning to put a monument in Veterans Park in honor of Bill. For more information, visit www.brianbillmemorial.org

memorial for brian bill

Washington BLVD to be renamed after Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Brian Report Bill

Patrick Sasser, Press Release September 19, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE --On September 27, 2013, the City of Stamford will hold a ceremony officially renaming sections of Washington Boulevard after Chief Petty Officer (SEAL) Brian Robert Bill, a Stamford native who lost his life along with 30 other SEALs in a tragic helicopter crash in Afghanistan in August 6, 2011. The ceremony will be held in the lobby of the Government Center, 888 Washington Blvd, Stamford, CT at 5:00 pm. The City will be reaming the section of Washington Boulevard between Tresser Boulevard and Broad Street. The renaming ceremony will be open to the public.

memorial for brian bill

Stamford memorial to fallen U.S. Navy Seal still in progress

Martin B. Cassidy Monday, August 5, 2013

STAMFORD, Conn --Residents seeking to build a memorial honoring the late U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill and working to locate that monument to the fallen U.S. Navy SEAL in the city are hoping to bring forward a plan to place it at Veterans Park, the leader of the effort said. "I don't want to drag this out, but the biggest thing we are working on right now is the plan," said Patrick Sasser, organizer for the Brian Bill Memorial Fund. "This monument is really to honor Brian as a hometown hero, to honor those who died in this last decade of war. We've honored veterans of the Korean War and Vietnam War and other conflicts, and it's time we start doing that for our modern heroes, too." Sasser, a Stamford firefighter who met Bill as a classmate at Trinity Catholic High School where they graduated in 1997, said fundraising efforts for the memorial have been temporarily slowed while members of the group's committee work with the monument's designer on a plan for Veterans Park. The monument is intended to honor Bill and other soldiers who have died in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq since 2001.

thunder on the sound motorcycle ride

Ride supports Bill memorial effort

Martin B. Cassidy Tuesday, September 18, 2012

STAMFORD -- While attending Trinity Catholic High School in the 1990s, Patrick Sasser remembered the late U.S. Navy SEAL Brian Bill already having envisioned a U.S. Navy career, ideally with a special forces unit. Sasser, 33, said he met Bill, a fellow city native, when they were both 12 years old, remaining close friends until they graduated high school in 1997. "I think it was incredible what he accomplished in his life," said Sasser, chairman of the Brian Bill Memorial Fund. "But even when we were younger, I was amazed at how he did things in the Scouts. "If he put his mind to doing something he would do it, and usually in the quickest way with the least effort." Since last month's launching of fundraising efforts for a city memorial to Bill, Sasser, Mayor Michael Pavia, Bill's family and others are promoting the fourth annual Thunder on the Sound Motorcycle Ride and Family Barbeque this month, which will benefit the planned monument. All proceeds of the Sunday ride will go to the Brian Bill Memorial Fund, which is aiming to raise $350,000 to build a permanent memorial to Bill and other veterans who fought or died in the war in Afghanistan or Iraq and other counterterrorism operations. Tickets are $30 a person, $12 per child age 12 and under. Bill died Aug. 6, 2011, when along with 29 other Americans and eight Afghan commandos, the Chinook helicopter he was in was shot down by a rocket-propelled grenade in Afghanistan. Sasser said to reach the $350,000 goal to build the bronze-and-granite memorial; he hopes he is able to get a large part of funds from interested residents along with contributions from businesses and corporate sponsors. Photo: Dru Nadler / Stamford Advocate Freelance

thunder on the sound motorcycle ride

New War Memorial To Honor Stamford SEAL

By: Anthony Buzzeo, September 11, 2012

STAMFORD, Conn. — Stamford will honor one of its own when the Brian Bill Memorial is built in honor of the former resident and Navy SEAL and the other servicemen and servicewomen who have lost their lives in the War Against Terror. “It’s time for Stamford to recognize this war,” said Patrick Sasser, chairman of the Brian Bill Memorial committee and a childhood friend of Bill. He and Mayor Michael Pavia came up with the idea to honor the fallen Navy SEAL shortly after Bill was killed in action in August 2011 in Afghanistan. He was 31 years old. After meeting when they were about 12, Sasser and Bill lost touch after high school. He heard how his friend was pursuing his dream of being a Navy SEAL when he saw Bill's mother, Patricia Parry, Sasser said. The next time he heard about Bill was from friend Jonathan Scofield, who broke the news of Bill's death to Sasser and his twin brother, Mike. “It hits you differently. It brings the war back home,” Sasser said of losing his friend. The committee hopes to raise $350,000 for the design and construction of the monument. According to the fund’s website, $6,900 has been raised so far. The committee has just started its fundraising effort, Sasser said, adding that he hopes residents feel a sense of ownership with the monument.
“We’re determined to see this through to the end,” Sasser said, adding that there is no timeline for building it. “I hope the people of Stamford open their hearts and their wallets to help memorialize these brave individuals,” said Bennett Salvatore, who joined the committee because he believes strongly in supporting all men and women who serve in the military.
A location for the memorial has not yet been named. The first fundraiser for the memorial will take place at Thunder On The Sound on Sept. 23. Participating in this year’s motorcycle ride will be Parry, who will be riding on the back of her son’s motorcycle, and his uncle, who will be driving it, Sasser said. To donate online or to learn more information about the memorial, visit www.brianbillmemorial.org.

brian bill its relevant

Stamford honors Navy SEAL killed in action

08/02/12- STAMFORD

A local Navy SEAL killed in the line of duty is being honored. Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill was killed on August 6, 2011 when his helicopter was shot down in Afghanistan. Stamford Mayor Mike Pavia and Gov. Dannel Malloy say the city will commemorate August 6 as Brian Bill Day. The Brian Bill Memorial Fund is also working to raise money to build a war monument in Stamford.

brian bill its relevant

One Year Later, A Navy SEAL Remembered

City Honors Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill
itsrelevant.com | Stamford | Added on August 01, 2012
brian bill family

Salute to fallen Navy SEAL

Martin B. Cassidy Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Mayor Michael Pavia presents Patricia and Michael Parry with a proclaimation declaring August 6 "Brian Bill Day" during a ceremony to commemorate the first anniversary of the death of their son, Navy SEAL Brian Bill, who grew up in Stamford and was killed in action in Afghanistan August 6, 2011. The ceremony, held in the lobby of Government Center, also announced the launching of plans to construct a memorial to veterans of the "War on Terror" in Stamford. Photo: Lindsay Niegelberg / Stamford Advocate

brian bill family

Press Conference: Wednesday August 1, 2012

August 6th to be declared "Brian Bill Day"
Lynn Arnow, Published July 27, 2012

Thursday, July 25, 2012 – Stamford, Mayor Michael A. Pavia cordially invites you to attend a press conference to recognize the first anniversary of the death of U.S. Navy Seal, Brian Bill. Chief Petty Officer Bill, along with several members of his Seal Team, was killed on August 6, 2011, when the U.S. helicopter in which they were flying was shot down near Kabul, Afghanistan.

Mayor Pavia, Governor Dannel P. Malloy, state and local officials, and family and friends, will gather to honor and commemorate August 6th, as “Brian Bill Day”, in the City of Stamford.

Details of the Brian Bill Memorial Fund, a private initiative lead by members of the Stamford community, will raise funds to create a lasting monument for all who have served died in the Global War on Terror, will also be shared.

When:Wednesday, August 1, 2012
Time:1:00 PM
Where:Stamford Government Center Lobby, 888 Washington Blvd., Stamford, CT

brian bill family

A Hero's Legacy

Never forgetting: Honoring fallen SEAL on first Memorial Day since his death
John Nickerson, Published 10:10 p.m. Stamford Advocate, Saturday, May 26, 2012

STAMFORD -- Patricia Parry always knew her son's job was dangerous.

A member of the elite U.S. Navy SEAL Team Six unit, Parry's son Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill was frequently deployed on combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan as part of the post Sept. 11, 2001 global war on terror.

Bill was killed along with 29 other Americans and eight Afghan commandos when the double-rotor Chinook helicopter taking them into a hot combat zone to reinforce coalition troops was hit by a Taliban fighter's rocket-propelled grenade. The Aug. 6 crash was the single deadliest day for American forces in Afghanistan since the war began in 2001.

Bill was 31.

Many Americans will pause this Memorial Day weekend to reflect on the sacrifices soldiers and sailors like Bill have made -- a daily remembrance for Parry and her husband Dr. Michael Parry.

On this first Memorial Day since Bill's death, the Parry's are attending ceremonies honoring their son and continuing to build a legacy for others to remember him.

"It is about remembering and honoring those who served and those who continue to serve," said Patricia Parry during an interview in their Westover home earlier this month. "People should thank everyone in the military for everything they do. They give up a lot for us and I don't think that is something that people think about very much,"

Most of all, Parry said Memorial Day is more than a day for a mattress sale.

Years before he was killed, Bill spoke to his mother about strength. Showing her the book, "The Gates of Fire," about the Battle of Thermopylae, Bill paged to the end of the historical novel.

There, Sparta's King Leonidas explained to a widow of the campaign how he chose 300 of his countrymen to help block an advancing Persian army from crossing the Thermopylae Pass. Leonidas told the woman that he chose the men because of the strength of their women.

"He read that to me five years ago, and I think he was sending a message," she said, before taking a moment to compose herself.

Parry said over the past 10 months she has been trying to measure up to what her son expected of her at this time. It is hard for anyone to understand what it is like until they lose someone; before she lost her son, she said she did not fully understand.

She says she cries sometimes, but she doesn't feel bad when it happens. "I feel it is perfectly normal and I'd worry about myself if I did not," she says.

But talking about her son is not something she wants to or will shy away from, she said.

"It is interesting that because of the circumstances surrounding Brian's death we are able to talk about it and we feel good when we get to talk about Brian every day," she said.

Although after a certain time society expects grieving people to "move on," Patricia Parry questioned what that means.

"Where am I going? That fact that you don't talk about something doesn't mean that you don't think about it every day," she said. "And sometimes talking about it, not for everyone, is very helpful. It makes you feel that the person you have lost is still with you. That is very true for me."

In the months since Bill's death, the Parrys, along with Bill's older brother, Christian Bill, and sister Amy Kutney have been healing while also working to share their memories and build a legacy.

"What I want people to know is how much their support has meant to us. We want to celebrate Brian's life all the time. He will always be with us and we want people to know that they don't have to be afraid," Patricia Parry said. "I think people are never sure what to say."

The family is getting ready to launch a non-profit organization in their son's name that will help the children of SEALs who have been killed in action by providing a way for them to participate in rugged outdoor activities that their fathers would have encouraged.

brian bill family

Norwich Raises Over $68k Towards Scholarship in Alum and Navy SEAL Brian Bill’s Name

This tournament was established to celebrate his life and generate financial support for the scholarship established in his name at Norwich University.
Northfield, VT (PRWEB) July 17, 2012

STAMFORD -- Patricia Parry always knew her son's job was dangerous.

A member of the elite U.S. Navy SEAL Team Six unit, Parry's son Chief Petty Officer Brian Bill was frequently deployed on combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan as part of the post Sept. 11, 2001 global war on terror.

Bill was killed along with 29 other Americans and eight Afghan commandos when the double-rotor Chinook helicopter taking them into a hot combat zone to reinforce coalition troops was hit by a Taliban fighter's rocket-propelled grenade. The Aug. 6 crash was the single deadliest day for American forces in Afghanistan since the war began in 2001.

Bill was 31.

Many Americans will pause this Memorial Day weekend to reflect on the sacrifices soldiers and sailors like Bill have made -- a daily remembrance for Parry and her husband Dr. Michael Parry.

On this first Memorial Day since Bill's death, the Parry's are attending ceremonies honoring their son and continuing to build a legacy for others to remember him.

"It is about remembering and honoring those who served and those who continue to serve," said Patricia Parry during an interview in their Westover home earlier this month. "People should thank everyone in the military for everything they do. They give up a lot for us and I don't think that is something that people think about very much,"

Most of all, Parry said Memorial Day is more than a day for a mattress sale.

Years before he was killed, Bill spoke to his mother about strength. Showing her the book, "The Gates of Fire," about the Battle of Thermopylae, Bill paged to the end of the historical novel.

There, Sparta's King Leonidas explained to a widow of the campaign how he chose 300 of his countrymen to help block an advancing Persian army from crossing the Thermopylae Pass. Leonidas told the woman that he chose the men because of the strength of their women.

"He read that to me five years ago, and I think he was sending a message," she said, before taking a moment to compose herself.

Parry said over the past 10 months she has been trying to measure up to what her son expected of her at this time. It is hard for anyone to understand what it is like until they lose someone; before she lost her son, she said she did not fully understand.

She says she cries sometimes, but she doesn't feel bad when it happens. "I feel it is perfectly normal and I'd worry about myself if I did not," she says.

But talking about her son is not something she wants to or will shy away from, she said.

"It is interesting that because of the circumstances surrounding Brian's death we are able to talk about it and we feel good when we get to talk about Brian every day," she said.

Although after a certain time society expects grieving people to "move on," Patricia Parry questioned what that means.

"Where am I going? That fact that you don't talk about something doesn't mean that you don't think about it every day," she said. "And sometimes talking about it, not for everyone, is very helpful. It makes you feel that the person you have lost is still with you. That is very true for me."

In the months since Bill's death, the Parrys, along with Bill's older brother, Christian Bill, and sister Amy Kutney have been healing while also working to share their memories and build a legacy.

"What I want people to know is how much their support has meant to us. We want to celebrate Brian's life all the time. He will always be with us and we want people to know that they don't have to be afraid," Patricia Parry said. "I think people are never sure what to say."

The family is getting ready to launch a non-profit organization in their son's name that will help the children of SEALs who have been killed in action by providing a way for them to participate in rugged outdoor activities that their fathers would have encouraged.

Monument To Honor Fallen Conn. Navy SEAL Brian Bill

A committee of seven will decide the form of the monument that will honor Brian Bill. The Rev. Richard Futie, who knew Brian as a young boy attending Catholic school in Stamford, is one of the seven and says it’s his hope that the statue portrays Brian with exact likeness so that only a stranger would have to make reference to the inscription below. “That those who know him will say ‘That’s him.’ capturing his smile, capturing his intense eyes,” he told WCBS 880 Connecticut Bureau Chief Fran Schneidau. He wants it to capture the spirit of the man who dedicated his life to training and then serving as a U.S. Navy SEAL only to be killed in action over Afghanistan just days before his 32nd birthday.